Bali News Update Week 42.

This Lion has No Pride

Hundreds of Lion Air Passengers Waiting for Compensation Following More than Four-Hour Delay in Denpasar-Jakarta Flight

 

(11/6/2013) Nearly two hundred passengers on board Lion Air (JT 033) flying from Denpasar to Jakarta on Sunday, November 3, 2013, were delayed by more than 4 hours.  Bisnis.com reports these passengers are angered at Loin Air's refusal to honor an earlier promise and legal obligation to pay Rp 300,000 (US$27) in compensation.

 

The newspaper reports that the compensation promised to all passengers upon arrival on Sunday evening in Jakarta had yet to be paid on Monday.

The passengers were apparently also denied light refreshment as stipulated under the Aviation Law of 2011 (PM No. 77/20122) concerning commercial air passengers and flight delays.

 

Donald, a passengers scheduled to fly on JT 033, told the press that the plane was originally scheduled to depart Bali at 6:15 pm on Sunday evening. Several minutes before the scheduled departure time, a delay of the flight until 7:00 pm was announced due to late arrival of the aircraft from Jakarta. In the end, the plane departed Bali at 10:23 pm – more than four hours late.

 

Videos of angry passengers arguing with Lion Air in Bali were quickly posted to YouTube. The video shows a heated debate between Lion Air ground staff and angry passengers over compensation. 

 

An Airline staff member named “Fendi”  assured passengers that compensation would be paid upon landing in Jakarta. In Jakarta, however, the promised compensation was not prepared or paid as primised on Monday morning, November 4, 2013.

 

According to the Bisnis.com, the secretary of the Lion Air Group, Aditya Simanjuntak, was unable to answer the newspaper’s questions on when the promised compensation would be paid. Meanwhile, more senior members of the Airline’s management were unavailable for comment due to their absence in Bangkok attending the launch of Thai Lion Air.

 

Bisnis.com published the following passenger-supplied chronology of the delayed flight incident for JT 033 Denpasar-Jakarta on Sunday, November 3, 2013:

JT 033 Denpasar-Jakarta was scheduled to depart at 6:15 pm. Several minutes before departure a delay announcement with the new time of 7:00 pm was made, blamed on later arrival of aircraft from Jakarta.

At 7:00 pm no boarding information was shared with the waiting passengers. At 7:45 pm an announcement of a delay until 10:00 pm was made by ground staff, blamed again on late arrival of aircraft from Jakarta.

At this point, passengers began approaching the Lion Air Counter requesting food and refreshments. Until 8:20 pm no Lion Air official was able to confirm that refreshments, as required under law, would be provided.

Growing increasingly frustrated, passengers began to approach and insist on compensation in accordance with the regulations of the Ministry of Transportation. Counter staff repeatedly told the waiting passengers that the chief of passenger handling Erick S, based in Jakarta, would coordinate the matter. 

When the flight was more than 4 hours late, passengers began demanding the Rp. 300,000 (US$27) – their entitlement under the law when a flight is fours late.

At 9:00 pm “Fendy” – a Lion Air ground staff at the departure gate in Bali promised passengers that compensation would be paid on the airplane and reportedly began shouting out a command “Get the money ready, Get the money ready.” When the gate opened, a portion of the passengers unsuccessfully demanded the compensation payment be made before they boarded, Around 30 passengers reportedly refused to board the aircraft.

Fendi reportedly called his Jakarta-based boss, Erick,  and told him “We’ve been hit by Ministerial Decree Number 77” and said he would sign a declaration for the payment of compensation would be paid in Jakarta. Passengers standing near the gate heard Fendy using the speakerphone facility on his Gemini Blackberry then received authorization from Erick to sign the promise to compensate.

Once the passengers boarded, a passenger in seat 10B discovered his seat had been double booked. Arrangements were made to find an empty seat. The airplane pushed back from its parking bay at 10:20 pm – four hours late.

The plane left at 10:30 pm. On board the flight no refreshments were distributed and no announcement on compensation was made. The flight crew did, however, offer paid meals for those passengers willing to pay for food or drink.

The plane landed in Jakarta at 11:00 pm local time. No passenger bus greeted the landing plane, leaving passengers to walk an estimated 300 meters to the terminal.

Attempts to secure compensation from Lion Air Staff inside the terminal were unsuccessful. Passengers were then told that Erick would meet with them and asked to wait.

A foreign passenger who scheduled a four-hour transit period in Jakarta to connect with a flight to Canada, missed his international flight by only 5 minutes, suffering a loss he claimed amounted to Rp. 17 million (US$1,550) .

30 minutes after the aircraft landed in Jakarta, Erick, the Lion Air Staff in charge of passenger handling arrived, saying passengers would only receive food and drink, but no money. Erick told the passengers the delay was less than 4 hours.

The foreign passenger then demanded Lion Air help him find a new flight to Canada or provide compensation for the delayed flight and a hotel.

At midnight, Lion Air handed out boxes of food. Some passengers were reportedly sufficiently angry that they threw the offered food on the floor. The Lion Air agent, Erick. was adamant in insisting cash compensation for the delayed flight would not be paid and that the flight was not four hours late.

The Official Record

 

A check of the Flightaware.com website - an internationally recognized international on-line flight tracking system, records that the scheduled departure time of JT 033 on Sunday November 3, 2013 was 06:15 pm, but, in fact, actually departed Bali at 10:23 pm – clearly more than four hours after schedule

 

Moscow Rules

Russian Honorary Consul in Bali Seeks Higher Level of Security for Russian Visitors

 

(11/6/2013) The Honorary Consul for Russia in Bali, Chairul Nuku Kamka, has expressed concern over a number of recent criminal cases in Bali in which Russians visitors have been victims.

 

Saying Bali visitors need guarantees of safety, Kamka said: “Both villas and boarding houses used by foreigners need to be supervised by the government and law enforcement agencies. While the government is promoting Bali tourism in extraordinary ways, it also needs to provide guarantees of safety.”

 

Speaking to The Bali Post on Friday, November 1, 2013, Kamka, who also manages a travel organization handling Russian tourists to Bali, warned that without security guarantees Bali would only manage to attract low-quality tourists in the future. Adding, “Without supervision and a guarantee of security, even guests staying in hotels will lose their belongings.”

 

While admitting that Russian tourists prefer better quality hotels in the busier areas of South Bali, Kamka said attention must also be paid to home stays and boarding houses, commenting that problems in any area of Bali’s tourism industry can damage the destination’s image.

 

Through the end of September 2013, a total of 62,172 Russian tourists had visited Bali, an increase of 18.19 percent over the same period the year before. Kamka estimates that Russian tourists spend an average of 10-14 days when visiting Bali.

 

Best Year Ever for Bali Arrivals

Bali by the Numbers: Australian Arrivals Stagnate as Bali Sets New Records Arrivals on the Way to 3.25 million Foreign Tourists for 2013

 

(11/6/2013) Total foreign arrivals to Bali for September 2013 totaled 309,216 – a record-high number of arrivals for the month and 26.9% more than the 243,722 foreign visitors who came to Bali in September 2012.

 

On a cumulative basis for January – September foreign arrivals hit 2,409,334 – an increase of 13.31% over the same nine month in the previous year.

 

On the assumption that the 13.3% growth rate is sustained through year’s end, Bali will surge past the psychological threshold of 3 million foreign visitors for the first time in its tourism history ending 2013 with 3.28 million foreign visitors.

 

Balidiscovery.com project total tourist arrivals, both foreign and domestic, will hit 7.25 million by year’s end 2013.

 

Still firmly in first place as Bali’s leading source of foreign visitors the Australian market is showing signs of stagnancy by declining 1.32% during January-September 2013 as compared to the same months in 2012. At 601,482 Australian visitors year-to-date through the end of September, Australians represent a 25% market share of all foreign arrivals to the Island.

 

Double-digit year-to-date growth was recorded from the following main source markets to Bali: Mainland China (28.60%), Japan (17.64%), South Korea (10.80%), France (17.31%), Taiwan (26.33%), U.S.A. (12.24%), Germany (14.53%), Russia (18.19%), and India (28.06%).

 

Ay Caramba! The RIMBA Jimbaran Bali

Gala Opening of RIMBA Jimbaran Bali Draws Hundred to a Party on a South Bali Cliff Top

 

(11/4/2013)

On Friday, November 1, 2013, RIMBA Jimbaran Bali Resort formally opened its doors with grand celebratory party without match in recent Island memory

 

With a guest list of “who’s who” in Bali and international travel, the unique and highly captivating Sister-Hotel to the AYANA Resort and Spa, the new RIMBA Jimbaran Bali occupies its own spacious 8-hectare corner within the larger 88-hectare resort complex.

 

Shrinking the wide expanse, guests attending the Grand Opening were ferried in buggies and trolley cars from a satellite parking area, down roads through wooded parkways before arriving at the magnificent resort-within-a-resort. As guests paused to register and enjoy a welcoming drink and Middle Kingdom canapés at the Ah Yat Abalone Seafood Restaurant, a helicopter zoomed overhead with film teams catching the crowds exploring the new facility and the adjoining world renowned Rock Bar at the AYANA Resort.

 

Designed to be strikingly different, the 282-room RIMBA Jimbaran Resort  takes full advantage of the property's position on a cliff overlooking the Indian Ocean. Emphasizing nature and understated elegance, the public areas, venues and guest access areas use natural stone materials and recycled wood salvaged from old ships - all uderlining the close connection to nature of the RIMBA Jimbaran. 

 

In an act of simple surrender to the beauty of the natural surroundings, the hotel remains luxuriantly simple without futilely trying to compete with Nature’s handiwork visible at evry turn.

 

The cleverly designed grand opening was a progressive affair, exposing guests to public areas, pools, fitness center, rooms and dining and restaurant venues before finally adjourning to the poolside gardens where food and drink were enjoyed. The Owner of the Resort, Rudy Suliawan, officiated at the inauguration with members of his team. Later, percussion groups, dancers, male and female models in body paint, music from Bali’s internationally acclaimed Balawan and a pyrotechnic display added to the merriment.

 

Bali’s Booming Sex Industry

HIV/AIDS Activists Estimate 8,000 – 9,000 Commercial Sex Workers in Bali Serve a Local Customer Base of 125,0000

 

(11/4/2013) Figures provided by the secretary of the Commission for the Control of AIDS (KPA), Made Suprapta, and published by The Bali Post estimate there are 125,000 customers of commercial sex workers in Bali and that most of these “customers” are Balinese.

 

KPA counts between 8,000 – 9,000 commercial sex workers as being “on the job” in Bali.

 

Of concern to those observing developments in Bali’s sex trade is the shift from new HIV/AIDS infections from intravenous drug users to infections link to sexual contact. 

 

The number of HIV cases in Bali as of August 2013 numbers 8,141 victims with the total number of infections, both known and undiscovered, put at a figure nearer to 25,000.

 

While KPA has been successful in raising awareness on the need for safe sex practice in Bali among workers in the sex industry, there remains strong resistance to the use of condoms by those who patronize prostitutes.

 

This resistance to use condoms on the part of Balinese customers of prostitutes is also blamed for alarming rate of new HIV infections among wives and children within the larger Balinese community.

 

A Zone Defense

Calls to Demolish Illegal Structures and Jail Those who Break Building Permit Regulations

 

(11/3/2013) A member of a special legislative committee to examine problems and issues surrounding the issuance of Building Permits (IMB) is calling for those proven to be violating existing rules to be subjected to criminal prosecution.

 

Bali Post reports that Nyoman Satria, a member of an IMB Legislative Task Force (PANSUS IMB), says violations of IMB rules have become rampant due to weak enforcement by the relevant agencies of the government. “Stronger supervision from the applicable agencies must be strengthened further in order that the number of violations can be reduced,: said Satria.

 

Satria said the punishments handed down for those who break IMB rules are far too light. He said fines imposed by the law would not answer the problem, with jail time and forced demolition of structures now needed.

 

To this end, Satria is calling for criminal penalties to be included in current plans to redraft zoning laws.

 

Drug Delusions

New Kerobokan Prison Warden Vows to Make Bali Prison Drug-Free

 

(11/3/2013) Farid Junaedi, the newly appointed warden of Bali’s Kerobokan Prison has announced that he is prepared to join forces with the public and religious figures to help eliminate drug usages at Bali’s largest prison.

 

Farid, who replaces I Gusti Ngurah Wiratna who has retired from the prison service, has vowed to “work to bring the Kerobokan prison in a better direction.” Adding, “What’s clear, fighting narcotics is a top priority.”

 

As reported by DenPost, in response to accusations laid by the National Anti-Narcotics Agency (BNN) that the Kerobokan Prison is a center for illlicit drug activities, he said that beyond any such allegations from BNN, his policy and commitment would be that no drugs are to be allowed enterance onto the prisons’ grounds.

 

The appointment of Junaedi comes shortly after photographs appeared in the Bali press purportedly showing a woman prisoner at the jail engage in drug use.

 

The Remains of the Day

Body of Missing Balinese Fisherman Recovered Near Bali Toll Road Seven Days after His Disappearance

 

(11/3/2013) After missing for seven days, the body of a missing fisherman who disappeared while angling under Bali’s new Mandara Toll Road was recovered on Sunday, October 27, 2013.

 

The body of I Made Suka Prabudita Wasesa (26) was found entangled in mangrove trees north of the toll road, first sited and reported to police by a worker on the new roadway.

 

The body was recovered one day after search and rescue officials had officially given up a six daylong search.

 

Wasesa was wading through the shallows surrounding the toll way with five companions when he slipped and fell into a deep area of water and disappeared from sight.

 

Covering Your Tracks

Promised Removal of Access Roads for Mandara Bali Toll Road Yet to be Honored

 

(11/3/2013) Promises by the builders and operators of Bali’s new Mandara Toll Road to remove all limestone access roads built across the Benoa Bay mangrove during the construction phase of the project remain unfulfilled.

 

According to NusaBali, the Jasa Marga Bali Toll has failed to return water flows under the new toll way to near-normal by keeping their promise to remove all the limestone access roads temporarily installed as at the time of construction. 

 

The spokesman for the project, Drajad Hari Suseno, said that removal of the limestone remains the responsibility of the contractors and continues to be carried out on a daily basis.

 

In one instance, local fishermen have asked Jasa Marga Bali Toll not to remove part of the limestone road now use as a land spot for local fishermen.

 

That Certain Glow

Indonesia Prepares to Install Radiation Monitors at Bali Airport to Deter Threat of Nuclear Terrorist Attack

 

(11/3/2013) The Atomic Energy Supervision Agency (BAPETAN) is planning to install a Pedestrian Radiation Portal Monitor (RPM) at Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

 

Such a step is seen as necessary to anticipate possible future terrorism attacks using weapons of mass destruction comprised of deadly nuclear materials.

 

Martua Sinaga, the deputy for permits and inspections from BAPETAN, attending a executive session on Nuclear Safety in Kuta, said: “For Bali, we will ask that a Pedestrian Radiation Monitor be installed. This is for people carrying bags. So we need to be careful.”

 

As reported by NusaBali, the RPM can detect radioactivity and nuclear materials concealed on a person or their luggage. Unlike the body and luggage scanners now in operation, RPMs are specifically targeted against the nuclear materials.

 

BAPETAN’s current plans are for RPM devices to be installed at the Bali Airport. Working in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), plans are underway. BAPETAN plans to install large-scale detectors in three seaports outside of Bali: the Tanjung Mas Port (Semaranag), Bitung Port (North Sulawesi) and Soekarno-Hatta Port (Makassar).

 

The chief of BAPETAN, As Natio Lasman, said that RPMs already in operation in Surabaya, Jakarta and Medan are all on-line and monitored on a real time basis directly by his agency.

 

Drilling to Remain Sharp

Bali Emergency Response Teams Conduct Practice Drills on South Kuta Beach

 

(11/3/2013) Imagine a horrible scenario in which a tourist vessel from Bali bound for Nusa Lembongan is struck by a large wave and capsizes with 20 tourists and 5 crew on board.

 

Such an imaginary series of events formed the background for an emergency drill undertaken by local citizens, water police and search and rescue officials on Thursday, October 31, 2013 near the Patra Jasa Beach, close to Bali’s Ngurah Rai International Airport.

 

As reported by DenPost, following procedures set forth and practiced to prepare for such situations, fishermen working near the Patra Jasa Beach raised the alarm with local villagers who contacted Search and Rescue workers, who immediately deployed to the scene of the accident.

 

As the floundering victims of the boat mishap were ferried to shore, triage and emergency first aid were administered by the First Response Team (TRC) of from the Badung Disaster Relief Team (BPBD). Survivors identified to be in a critical condition were sent to nearby hospitals by ambulance.

 

Thankfully, this was only an imaginary scenario undertaken as a practice drill by members of the community and official agencies coordinated by the Badung Disaster Relief Team (BPBD). In all, 65 members of Badung community groups; the Badung Indonesian Red Cross; instructors and trainers in natural disaster training; the Indonesian Armed Forces; and the Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency – all participated in the drill.

 

Similar disaster drills are routinely carried out in various parts of Bali, encompassing both natural and man-made disasters, to maintain a high state of readiness among community members and emergency response teams.

 

Digging Up Bali’s Ancient Past

Farmer Discovers 2,300-year-old Burial Sarcophagus Near Pupuan, Bali

 

(11/3/2013) The Jakarta Globe and DenPost report that a farmer planting coffee trees near Pupuan Village in Tabanan, West Baliuncovered a stone sarcophagus on Tuesday, October 29, 2013, estimated to be 2,300 year old by government archaeology officials.

 

The head of the Denpasar Archaeology Agency, Wayan Suantika, confirmed that the stone coffin was approximately two meters long with a width of two meters. 

 

The coffee farmer who found the important artifact was I Nyoman Santika. 

 

Experts are postulating that the stone coffin would have been used for the burial of an important public figure.

 

The discovery confirms scientific theory that Bali was settled some 4,000 years ago as part of the Austronesian migration process.

 

Since You Asked

Bali and East Indonesia Visitors Use Bank Indonesian Survey to List Their Complaints on Services and Facilities

 

(11/3/2013) Bali Daily (The Jakarta Post) reports that a Bank Indonesia Survey seeking feedback from tourist visitors to Bali and Nusa Tenggara identified cleanliness, traffic congestion and problems with infrastructure as main source of tourists’ complaints.

 

Based on open-ended responses from 1,000 visitors who participated in the Bank Indonesia Survey, the main complaints highlighted were:

Absence of information on tourist spots, a problem that became more pronounced in remote areas.

A lack of standard pricing for goods and services.

Taxis that refused to use taximeters.

Dishonest and deceptive moneychangers.

Lack of specific language skills by tour operators and tour guides.

Lack of hygiene in public toilet and public facilities.

Dirty roads and beaches.

Poor road conditions.

Lack of tourist information centers and collateral materials (e.g. maps).

Lack of Wi-Fi spots.

Lack of designated smoking areas in public places.

Poor ferry service between Bali and Java.

Too many beggars.

Too many dogs on public streets

Congested roadways in South Bali.

Reckless drivers.

Aggressive hawkers.

Lack of reliable public transport.

High cost of airport taxes and visa-on-arrival

Dwi Pranoto, the head of the Bank Indonesia office for Bali and Nusa Tenggara said the survey was undertaken by the bank to help interested parties cooperate to improve tourism services in Bali.

 

© Bali Discovery Tours. Articles may be quoted and reproduced if attributed to http://www.balidiscovery.com.

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